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Pacific Oaks College    
2022-2023 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
 
  Nov 27, 2022
 
2022-2023 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook

Bachelor of Arts in Community Psychology


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LOCATIONS

Pasadena, Online, and off-campus locations

*The availability of off-campus locations depends on enrollment.

Program Overview and Philosophy

The School of Cultural & Family Psychology’s Bachelor of Arts in Community Psychology (BA CP) seeks to promote well-being, empower and invigorate communities and support a sense of community and family centric models of service and learning.  Our strength-based programs aim to enhance protective factors and prevent the development of problems in communities, groups and families.  Grounded in social justice and equity frameworks, individuals will learn how to advocate for change in traditionally underserved communities.  Our curriculum is designed to go beyond an individual focus by integrating sociological, economic, cultural, environmental, political and global influences to promote positive change, health and empowerment at multiple levels.

The BA in Community Psychology (BA CP) is designed as a four-year program in both on-ground and online formats.  The BA CP program is a 120-credit undergraduate program, comprised of 40 credits in General Education, 15 credits in Lower Division Psychology Prerequisites, 32 credits in Lower Division General Electives, 21 credits in Community Psychology Core Curriculum, and 12 credits in Concentration Courses.   Students will be able to transfer up to 87 credits from another institution.  GE courses may also be completed by Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) or college transfer credit. Please refer to the Transfer Credit Policy on PLA and transfer equivalencies. The Concentrations are (1) Generalist; (2) ECE Trauma; (3) Business Management; and (4) Human Resource Management. The BA Community Psychology Instructional Sites/ Offsite cohorts require approval from the Dean before entering after the cohort has started.

This program offers busy students a perfect balance of flexibility and live interaction.

Community Psychology Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

PLO 1:  Gain knowledge and comprehension of the human life cycle within an eco-systemic framework. Students will be able to look at individuals throughout their lifespan using Urie Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory of Development as a foundational framework as the lens for understanding how people interact within their communities over time.  Students will use case studies to facilitate their understanding of these concepts.  Additional theories to be explored will be Barker’s Social-Ecological Approach; and Kelly’s Ecological Approach to Community Psychology.  Some of the skills and abilities students will learn from learning this ecological approach are:  Mindfulness, Systemic Thinking; Listening Skills, Cross-cultural Competence, Facilitating Communication.

PLO 2:  Be able to identify resources from multicultural stakeholders to address social issues. Students will develop skills such as ‘Community Mapping’ and action/field research in their fieldwork sites, to identify needed resources relevant to a particular population.  Students will create resource guides, complete needs assessments, and community mapping projects to demonstrate knowledge of these skills.

PLO 3:  Learn and implement interdisciplinary approaches and strategies for community program assessment and research. Students will learn Community Psychology values and principles for conducting assessments, such as participatory evaluation and action-oriented assessment.  Students will demonstrate knowledge competencies in these areas in their Fieldwork Needs Assessment assignment and Capstone project.

PLO 4:  Be able to discuss and analyze effective prevention, intervention, and health promotion strategies for individuals, groups, and communities. Students will learn foundational prevention and promotion theories and concepts, such as Caplan: Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Prevention; The IOM Report: Universal, Selective, and Indicated Measures; Prevention of Disorder and Promotion of Wellness and Competence.  Students will research examples of successful prevention and promotion programs.  Students will demonstrate knowledge by completing a literature review on the prevention and promotion topic of their choice.

PLO 5:  Develop multicultural competency through community-based training and experience. Students will understand human diversity in its context by participating in a Fieldwork placement experience.  Students are required to spend 80 hours at a community organization of their choice.  These experiences will build upon cross-cultural theories learned in coursework to provide competence needed for effective intervention with culturally diverse clients in local and global communities. Their fieldwork experiences will span over two terms/semesters.

Each BA in Community Psychology PLO is aligned with WSCUC Core Competencies.  Below is a description of which BA CP PLOs are aligned with each Core Competency.

Written Communication- Students will demonstrate mastery in this competency with reflection papers, research papers, and discussion questions.  Assignments will include rubrics for expectations on paper structures depending on the type of written assignment.

  • PLO 1:  Gain knowledge and comprehension of the human life cycle within an eco-systemic framework.
  • PLO 2:  Be able to identify resources from multicultural stakeholders to address social issues.
  • PLO 4:  Be able to discuss and analyze effective prevention, intervention, and promotion strategies for individuals, groups, and communities
  • PLO 5:  Develop multicultural competency through community-based training and experience.

Information Literacy-  Students will demonstrate mastery in this competency by conducting research online, fieldwork assignments, an annotated bibliography, and a literature review using a variety of sources found in the library’s database.  Several courses will include presentations by the Librarian.

  • PLO 1:  Gain knowledge and comprehension of the human life cycle within an eco-systemic framework.
  • PLO 2:  Be able to identify resources from multicultural stakeholders to address social issues.
  • PLO 3:  Be able to discuss and analyze effective prevention, intervention, and promotion strategies for individuals, groups, and communities

Critical Thinking-  Students will demonstrate mastery in this competency with small group discussions, individual and group projects, discussion questions, and fieldwork assignments that show the ability to develop and defend an argument.

  • PLO 1:  Gain knowledge and comprehension of the human life cycle within an eco-systemic framework.
  • PLO 2:  Be able to identify resources from multicultural stakeholders to address social issues.
  • PLO 3:  Learn and implement interdisciplinary approaches and strategies for community programs and research.

Oral Communication-  Students will demonstrate mastery of this competency with class discussions, visual presentations online, small group discussions, individual and group presentations.

  • PLO 1:  Be able to discuss and analyze effective prevention, intervention, and promotion strategies for individuals, groups, and communities
  • PLO 2:  Develop multicultural competency through community-based training and experience.

Quantitative Reasoning- Students will demonstrate mastery of this competency by conducting original research projects like needs assessments in fieldwork, assignments in the Integrative Statistics course, and the integration and use of statistics in the Capstone Project.

  • PLO 1: Learn and implement interdisciplinary approaches and strategies for community programs and research

Program Specific Requirements

General Education - School of Cultural & Family Psychology

The BA CP program is designed as a four-year program that is offered in both on-ground and online formats.  The BA CP program is a 120-credit undergraduate program, comprised of 40 credits in General Education, 15 credits in Lower Division Psychology Prerequisites, 32 credits in Lower Division General Electives, 21 credits in Community Psychology Core Curriculum, and 12 credits in Concentration Courses.

The program is a year-round program, including enrollment in the summer.  On-ground attendance includes fall and spring 16-week semesters and a 12-week summer semester.  Online attendance includes two 8-week terms in fall, spring, and summer.

A full-time student entering with 0 credits and successfully completing 12 credits per semester will have time to complete the program in ten semesters, which is equivalent to 3 1/3 years, or 40 months.

BA in Community Psychology Credit Requirements

40 General Education Credits

15 Lower Division Psychology Prerequisite Credits

32 General Elective Credits

21 Upper Division Community Psychology Core Curriculum Program Credits

  • Plus 12 credits for Generalist Concentration OR
  • Plus 12 credits for ECE Trauma Concentration OR
  • Plus 12 credits for Business Management -OR-
  • Plus 12 credits for Human Resource Management

120 Credits Total

Fieldwork Requirements

The Community Psychology Fieldwork program provides experience in various settings such as human service, mental health, community-based agency, government, and education.  This opportunity is for students to practice the skills and knowledge they have gained throughout the Community Psychology degree program in a professional setting.  Fieldwork can be central to developing clarity about a student’s career goals and sense of calling to specific work.  Students will work collaboratively with community partners, develop consultation and group skills, and learn what it means to be a community practitioner.  ALL Community Psychology students will be given a Portfolium account.

Fieldwork placement will occur over two terms/semesters.  There is a minimum of 40 hours per class (CP 470 & CP 480) required by each student at their site in each term/semester. 

Prerequisites for fieldwork: 1) Students have successfully completed CP 301, CP 310, CP 320, CP 410, & CP430; and 2) Students have secured a Fieldwork Site before starting their fieldwork courses.

Fieldwork will be managed by the department’s Fieldwork Coordinator.  Each student will be required to attend a Fieldwork Orientation, where students will receive a Fieldwork Manual, which will include the following information:  Code of Ethics and Professional Behavior Form, Fieldwork/Internship Contract Form, Fieldwork/Internship Deadlines and Preparation Checklist, Timesheet Form, Evaluation of Fieldworker/Intern Form, Evaluation of Site Form, Evaluation of Supervisor Form, and Fieldwork/Internship Site Directory.  Fieldwork Supervision will be provided jointly between the POC Instructor and the supervisor at the field site. The Fieldwork Coordinator will be a liaison between all entities to ensure quality.  The Fieldwork Coordinator will review all Site forms to determine if there are any problems or challenges that need to be addressed.

The Fieldwork Site List (pre-approved list of agencies) is not meant to be inclusive; rather it serves to give students ideas of the types and variety of fieldwork experiences students have developed. Students are encouraged to meet with the Faculty Advisor and the Fieldwork Coordinator to discuss possible Fieldwork sites that would best meet the interests of the student.  Typical Settings & Categories of Fieldwork:  Child/Youth; Elderly Services; Tutoring Services; Persons with Disabilities; Homelessness; Substance Abuse; Recreation Programs; Health/Prevention/Education; Domestic Violence; Autism Spectrum Disorders Services, After-school Programs; Hospice; Psychiatric facilities; Hotlines, clinics, shelters, hospitals, educational settings, non-profit agencies.  The type of fieldwork experience will depend on the student’s career goals, type of agency, and personalized learning plan created by the field supervisor and student.

There will be two Fieldwork courses that will accompany a student’s placement in the field. 

The first course is CP 470 Fieldwork in Community Psychology.  This course is designed to provide an opportunity to integrate classroom knowledge with real-world experiences.  This course focuses on applications of basic psychological knowledge and methods to community problems.  Students develop consultation and group skills, work collaboratively with community partners, and learn about the field of community psychology.

The second course is CP 480 Community Psychology Capstone and Fieldwork. This course is designed to be a ‘culminating’ experience in the undergraduate Community Psychology degree.  Students will create a final assessment portfolio which will include artifacts documenting academic and professional growth and personal reflections.  Students will incorporate their Signature Assignment from the first Fieldwork course into their final capstone project.  Each one of these courses is 3 credits.  Capstone projects and Fieldwork Signature Assignments will be submitted in Portfolium and Canvas. 

Residence requirement

All credits earned in courses offered by Pacific Oaks College are considered PO residence hours, regardless of if the courses are taken online, on-ground, at instructional sites or at Off-campus cohort locations. Credits earned from institutions other than Pacific Oaks College are considered non-resident credits. All students must complete 30 residence hours to complete the B.A. in Community Psychology.

Course length

Please refer to the program course and delivery section found here: Academic Calendar

Graduation Requirements

To be eligible to graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in Community Psychology degree, a student must successfully complete the following:

  • The approved program consists of at least 30 credits completed in residency at Pacific Oaks; and
  • Community Psychology (CP) students maintain a grade of “C” or 2.00 or above in community psychology core, concentration and prerequisite coursework. Students are required to submit the Petition for Degree Completion and fee to the Registrar’s Office the semester before they anticipate completing their degree requirements. Students must submit the application, settle all outstanding fees with the Student Finance Office, satisfy any deficiencies, and be in good standing in their program for the bachelor’s degree to be awarded.

Number of Admit Terms per Year

Ground: 3

  • Fall
  • Spring
  • Summer

Online: 3

  • Fall Sessions I
  • Spring Sessions I
  • Summer Sessions I

Program Admission Requirements:

Program-Specific Admissions Requirements can be found on the Admissions Policies page.

Program Requirements


General Education Requirements


Introduction


The General Education (GE) program at Pacific Oaks is an important part of the undergraduate education.   A well-planned General Education program of study will provide students with the skills they will need to excel in whatever disciplines they choose to pursue. 

A certain number of GE courses may be shared with a student’s degree program. However, GE courses may only be used to complete one GE category.  GE courses may also be completed by Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) or college transfer credit. Please refer to the Transfer Credit Policy on PLA and transfer equivalencies.

To complete the General Education program requirements, each student must complete courses in the six categories listed below.  All GE courses must be completed with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

Courses


Pacific Oaks Culture and Pedagogy (3 credits required)


English Communication (9 credits required)


(at least one course in English Composition and one course in oral communication)

Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning (3 credits required)


Arts and Humanities (9 credits required)


At least one course in the arts and one course in humanities

Physical and Biological Sciences (7 credits required)


One physical science course and one biological science or life science course, at least one of which includes a lab.

Total Required GE Credits: 40


Academic Advisors in the Center for Academic Advising can assist you with enrolling in GE courses.  They can direct you to suggested GE program options that meet your interests, help you with identifying shared GE courses in your degree program, and assist you in incorporating GE courses in your four-year plan. Faculty Advisors can also help you in selecting the best options to meet your academic goals.

Program Courses


Pacific Oaks College maintains a 30-credit residency requirement.

18 Credits total


21 Credits total


12 Credits Total


12 credits total


Human Resources Concentration


This concentration requires 12 credits

12 credits total


Business Management Concentration


This concentration requires 12 credits

12 credits total


Graduation Requirements


Students are required to submit the Petition for Degree Completion and fee to the Office of the Registrar the semester before they anticipate completing their degree requirements. Students must submit the application, settle all outstanding fees with the Student Finance Office, satisfy any deficiencies, and be in good standing in their program for the bachelor’s degree to be awarded.

Note: A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or above in credential coursework is required for the credential.

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