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2021-2022 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook
Pacific Oaks College
   
2021-2022 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
 
  Feb 01, 2023
 
2021-2022 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
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    VII 499a - Virtual International Internship

    2 Credit(s)
    This strengths-based virtual international internship experience provides the student with an opportunity to explore career interests while applying knowledge and skills learned in the classroom in a work setting.   The experience also helps students gain a clearer sense of what they still need to learn and provides an opportunity to build professional networks. Strengths Finder will be a main component of the course. Course can be taken up to three times for credit, with approval. Must be taken in sequence with VII499b. Both VII499a and VII499b must be taken to receive credit.


Other Courses

  
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    VII 499b - Virtual International Internship

    2 Credit(s)
    This strengths-based virtual international internship experience provides the student with an opportunity to explore career interests while applying knowledge and skills learned in the classroom in a work setting.   The experience also helps students gain a clearer sense of what they still need to learn and provides an opportunity to build professional networks. Strengths Finder will be a main component of the course. Course can be taken up to three times for credit, with approval. Prerequisite VII499a. Must be taken in sequence with VII499a. Both VII499a and VII499b must be taken to receive credit. Prerequisite(s): VII 499a Virtual International Internship  


Advocacy and Social Justice

  
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    ASJ 300 - A History of Social Justice Reform

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course provides a foundational framework to explore the origins of social justice theory, the research surrounding social justice movements and the historic distribution of social resources that result in injustice and disparity. Course content immerses students in the defining tenants of social justice and its movements, the dimension and scope of the movements, the criterion required for action, the salience of group and individual motivation towards justice, the capacity to form justice judgements, the cognitive and behavioral reactions to injustice and the cross-cultural generalizability of justice considerations.

  
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    ASJ 390 - Social Media, Technology and Social Change

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course demonstrates the roles that media, modern technology and Social Network Site (SNS) engagement have had on catalyzing movements and maintaining oppression and subjugation.  Students explore how communication tools used to fight injustice and maintain oppressive systems have evolved.  Furthermore, this course will directly address the value of critical thinking processes to positively impact information technology literacy and technological disparities like the Digital Divide. 

  
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    ASJ 590 - Harnessing the Power of Social Media and Technology for Social Impact and Change

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course analyzes the methods and techniques employed by media, modern technology and Social Network Site (SNS) engagement to impact social change movements.  Students evaluate communication tools used to fight injustice and maintain oppressive systems to generate multi-media protocol for social impact and change.  Students will examine the characteristics and utilization of varied media modalities including, but not limited to Social Network Sites, Streaming Media, Music and Television to assess their collective impact on organizing, mobilizing and effecting change or maintaining an existing system

  
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    ASJ 667 - Advocacy in Action: Fieldwork/Internship

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course serves as the fieldwork course for the MA in Advocacy and Social Justice degree program. Evaluation and analysis of empowerment and advocacy theory serves as a tool as students develop and implement their advocacy work.  The course operates from the Advocate-Researcher-Practitioner lens as students implement and assess their own advocacy work in a domain to impact equity, fairness, justice, inclusion and multi-culturalism. This course lays the foundation for the students Social Impact and Participatory Action Research Masters Project. Content provides strategies for the implementation of tools to recognize the understandable and predictable responses to oppression, subjugation and economic injustice within a variety of sociocultural contexts.  Students will observe, investigate and critically evaluate policies, practices and emergent issues from their fieldwork/internship. Seminar discussions focus on discoveries from evaluations, the investigation of theory for application, problem solving and grappling with cultural and ethical dilemmas. Each student is required to engage in 45 hours of service at an approved fieldwork/internship site during the semester they are enrolled in ASJ 450.

  
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    MLS 410 - The American Legal System

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course will introduce students to the Anglo-American system of law including sources of law such as Constitutions, statutes, case law, common law and regulations; the structure, jurisdiction, and functions of U.S. courts at both the federal and state levels; the role of law in American society; and the roles and responsibilities of legal professionals.

    Please note: ALL MLS Courses are conducted online, in collaboration with The Santa Barbara and Ventura Colleges of Law.

  
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    MLS 415 - Legal Fundamentals

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course will survey the fundamental legal principles of American law in the areas of torts, contracts, criminal law, constitutional law, property, family law, and ethics. The development of the law will be explored, from common law roots to more recent legislation and judicial decisions, culminating with discussion of current legal topics in each area and their implications for the workplace and society.

    Please note: ALL MLS Courses are conducted online, in collaboration with The Santa Barbara and Ventura Colleges of Law.

  
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    MLS 430 - Litigation & its Alternatives

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course explores the proceedings by which criminal and civil matters are litigated, and alternative strategies such as plea bargaining, restorative justice, negotiation, private and court-ordered commercial arbitration, private judging, mediation, negotiation, and neutral evaluation. After examining litigation alternatives, students will compare the costs and consequences of the various strategies to individuals and society.

    Please note: ALL MLS Courses are conducted online, in collaboration with The Santa Barbara and Ventura Colleges of Law.

  
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    MLS 435 - Research and Advocacy

    3.0 Credit(s)
    In this course students will learn the basics of how to perform legal research to identify and understand federal and state laws and then make the transition to oral and written communication in legal contexts. Students will gain an understanding of the underlying goals and implicit concerns involved in interactions among clients, legal counsel, legal adversaries, judges and juries.

    Please note: ALL MLS Courses are conducted online, in collaboration with The Santa Barbara and Ventura Colleges of Law.

  
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    MLS 440 - Administrative Process

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course examines the roles of administrative agencies in promulgating, administering and enforcing regulations. After considering the relationship of agencies to the judicial and legislative branches of government, students will study the rulemaking process, modes of administrative adjudication and judicial review of agency decisions. Topics for discussion will include effective strategies for contributing to the rulemaking process and regulatory compliance audits.

    Please note: ALL MLS Courses are conducted online, in collaboration with The Santa Barbara and Ventura Colleges of Law.

  
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    MLS 502 - Global Relationships

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course is a study of the legal rules surrounding the hiring, treatment, and termination of employees, their application in the workforce, and administrative and legal remedies for violations. The course covers Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and other federal and state laws concerning employment discrimination and wrongful discharge. Topics include workforce policies, staff manual provisions, employee evaluations, and employment litigation. Concentration: Frontiers

    Please note: ALL MLS Courses are conducted online, in collaboration with The Santa Barbara and Ventura Colleges of Law.


Business

  
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    ACC 201 - Principles of Accounting

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to financial accounting principles. Topics include basic accounting procedures, measurement of income and expense, working capital, and investments. 

  
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    ACC 202 - Principles of Management Accounting

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides the basic principles and applications of managerial and cost accounting, considering particularly how a manager’s understanding of accounting practices influence basic operational decisions. Prerequisite(s): ACC 201  

  
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    BUS 200 - 21st Century Business Skill Sets


    21st Century Business Skill Sets explores various business skills/abilities that are necessary in today’s business world, including a perspective which extends beyond domestic business to encompass a global view. The course includes literacies and proficiencies that prepare students to meet current challenges and opportunities. Student’s explore the following topics: soft skills, collaborating and working in teams, business etiquette, social skills, creativity and imagination, communication, adaptability, the virtual workplace, modern technologies, flexibility, networking, communication skills, social responsibility, and time management. This course has no prerequisites.

  
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    BUS 201 - Principles of Business

    3 Credit(s)
    This course, an Introduction to Business, will introduce you to ways of doing business. The course present business theory and background information, while activities within the course are designed to engage students in discussions, research, written assignments, on business operations today. Students will learn about our capitalistic system, how an entrepreneur starts a business, how a business is legally organized, the global opportunities in business, as well as the impact of social responsibility on business.

  
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    BUS 211 - Managerial Applications of Technology

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines the role of information technology as a source of competitive advantage for a business. The course analyzes how information technology aligns with business strategy to achieve organizational goals. Students will be introduced to varies computer business applications.  This course reviews the ethics of information technology as well as future trends in the field. 

  
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    BUS 212 - Business Law and Corporate Ethics

    3 Credit(s)
    The course introduces basic business law topics in employment law, contract law, and various business regulations, as well as ethical issues underlying the law and business’ responsibility to society more generally.  The application of law and ethics across cultures and countries is introduced.  Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  

  
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    BUS 220 - 21st Century Leadership and Beyond

    3 Credit(s)
    This course focuses on principles, theories, and models of leadership and the characteristics of effective leadership across multiple settings, both domestically and globally. Emphasis is placed on the critical role of communication and interpersonal skills in being an effective leader in today’s fast-paced and diverse organizations, as well as the leader’s role in modeling social responsibility, values and ethics in an organization. Leadership strengths and weaknesses are explored to determine relevant solutions for contemporary realities. Students are also introduced to the nature and components of negotiation and conflict management. Students explore their own leadership strengths and weaknesses. 

  
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    BUS 355 - e-Commerce

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the networked economy and its associated infrastructures. This course will introduce students to strategy, technology, capital, media and policy, and describe how each works to enable e-commerce today. 

  
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    BUS 365 - Marketing, Sales and Channel Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines the role of marketing, sales, and channel management. Topics include strategic sales and channel design, channel relations, sales force management, channel and sales evaluation, and gaining a competitive advantage through marketing, sales and channel management. The concept of sustainable marketing channels is introduced.  Prerequisite(s): MKT 230  

  
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    BUS 434 - International Finance Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course focuses on the study of financial institutions in the global economic environment. Among the areas covered are foreign exchange markets, international trade, global regulatory environments, interest rate volatility, and technological advances.  Prerequisite(s): FIN 401  

  
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    BUS 435 - Employment Law

    3 Credit(s)
    The course reviews basic employment laws including federal wage and hours, family medical leave, health and safety, and legal and ethical working requirements. It also emphasizes employee rights and obligations.  Prerequisite(s):      MGT 411  

  
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    BUS 436 - International Human Resources Management

    3 Credit(s)
    The course is a discussion of human resources management in a global context.  Topics will include expatriation, repatriation, the regulatory environment, and staffing and structural norms.  Prerequisite(s): MGT 411  

  
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    BUS 438 - Emerging Markets:

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to explore economic conditions of nations with commerce and/or social activities that are leading these nations to experience rapid industrialization and growth. Students develop an understanding as to how these markets are changing the world and speculate on the future of market powers with focus on technology, lending, and manufacturing. Students also strengthen their cultural competence skills as they demonstrate their level of proficiency using cultural competence models. 

  
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    BUS 455 - Entrepreneurship

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces students to the world of entrepreneurship. Topics include the importance of entrepreneurship, the characteristics of entrepreneurs, and the entrepreneurship process. Entrepreneurship in its various forms, including startup growth ventures, entrepreneurship in small and medium enterprises, and microbusinesses are explored. 

  
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    BUS 470 - Global Business Management

    3 Credit(s)
    Students study characteristics of international management and the bases for business among countries. Different perspectives on organizational behavior, human resource management, management styles, and the practical aspects of international management are discussed. Business in the international environment is interpreted from a strategic management and marketing perspective that yields practical guidance concerning the management of firms and social responsibility. 

  
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    BUS 475 - Strategic Cost Management:

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces the planning and control aspects of internal accounting.  A review of cost systems, cost behavior, direct costing, capital budgeting, decentralized operations, relevant costs, budgets, differential cost, and variance analysis are presented.  The role of cost analysis in strategic management decision models is analyzed.  Prerequisite(s): FIN 401  

  
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    BUS 499 - Business Strategic Planning

    3 Credit(s)
    In this course students will learn a framework for strategic planning as it relates to the analysis, evaluation, development, and implementation of corporate strategy, both domestically and globally. Students will learn both the internal and external factors that must be considered when formulating a strategy for a company. Additional emphasis is focused on the ethical and social responsibility considerations that impact strategic planning. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least 108 credits

  
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    COM 105 - Business and Professional Communication

    3 Credit(s)
    The role of communication in the effective management of formal organizations is studied.  A comprehensive course in business communication, that includes the study and practice of concepts and skills as they apply to business and professional settings including written and oral communications, and business and professional presentations.  Special attention is given to learning to communicate effectively in multiple formats as professional in today’s digital, social, and mobile world. This course will focus on written communication skills with emphasis on clear, concise writing; Students develop further skills in written, oral and other methods of business communication.  The course also explores the impact of cultural differences on business communication in the modern global business world, as well as communicating in a socially responsible manner.

  
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    ECO 201 - Macroeconomics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces students to macroeconomics, the study of the economy as a whole. Macroeconomics applies the basic principles of economics to whole economic systems and the relationships among sectors of the economy. Topics include GDP, unemployment, inflation, national income and employment theory, government expenditures and taxation, the role of the banking system, and monetary and fiscal policies. Topics on global perspectives on trade and international economics and exchange rate theory are also explored.

  
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    ECO 202 - Microeconomics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course on microeconomics studies how individuals and firms make consumption and production decisions, and how these decisions determine the allocation of scarce resources in a market. Students will learn the fundamentals of consumer and producer decision making starting with basic concepts such as supply and demand, equilibrium, consumer utility, income and substitution effect, demand, diminishing marginal returns, profit maximization, and supply.

  
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    FIN 401 - Financial Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides the basic skills an organization utilizes to conduct fundamental financial analysis, including key financial rations, including: break-even analysis, net present value calculations, internal rates of return, as well as the use of basic financial ratios in managerial decision-making.  Students are also introduced to sensitivity analysis and how to adjust their analysis based on risk factors in the decision process.  Perspectives on global finance are also examined, as are the decision making around social responsibility and ethics in financial decision making. Prerequisite(s): ACC 202  and ECO 201  

  
  
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    MGT 250 - Cultural Diversity in the Workplace

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will introduce the student to basic concepts of human and organizational behavior. Topics covered will include relationships, perception, motivation, styles of leadership, the impact of change on organizations and individuals and organizational ethics.  Students will learn to manage the increasingly multicultural workforce domestically, and global workforce. Students will learn to: (1) evaluate their strengths and weaknesses with regard to personality, perception, motivation, job satisfaction, and performance; 2) analyze group dynamics, decision making, and aspects of conflict to learn new strategies in interpersonal communications for improving group performance; 3) to apply knowledge of leadership, power, and management in the evaluation of how a company can improve performance. An emphasize on social responsibility, ethics, diversity and inclusion is included. Prerequisite(s): BUS 220  

  
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    MGT 280 - Principles of Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course explores the dynamics of management in the modern organization. Examines the history of management, as well as its current functions involving such issues as motivation, diversity, quality, ethics, and the global environment.   3

  
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    MGT 334 - Data-Driven Decision Making

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines the dynamic nature of management information systems (MIS) from the perspective of the users to add effectiveness and efficiency to decision making as well as routine operations. Students learn how to use data analytics to ascertain useful information managers need to make sound decisions using diverse techniques.  Students explore decision tools such as basic descriptive data and common assessment practices to inform and improve the management decision process within organizations. 

  
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    MGT 402 - Project Management

    3 Credit(s)
    The course builds from the basic disciplines to apply them in project management settings using project management software and related tools.  Case studies and/or simulations in project management applications are also provided; Students will have the opportunity to work on domestic and global simulations. A perspective on including social responsibility in the qualitative considerations of project management are also explored.

  
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    MGT 411 - Human Resources Management:

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to the formulation and implementation of human resource policy concerned with the major aspects of how an organization manages its people. A look at human resource management both domestically and globally is included. The employee life cycle from recruiting to retention to motivation to exit is discussed.  The course examines techniques of human resource planning; recruiting, selecting, training, and evaluating personnel; compensation and benefits administration; and union/management relations. The course examines internal culture, diversity and inclusion, and the social responsibility incumbent in these values.   Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  

  
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    MGT 413 - Managing Change

    3 Credit(s)
    This course begins with the premise that managing and leading change in the face of uncertainty and risk is a central task of the organizational leadership team, whether considering a large multinational organization or a start-up biotechnology venture.  Topics include organizational development approaches to developing the processes and practices. 

  
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    MGT 416 - Operations Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents students with opportunities to apply traditional management functions that include planning, organizing, controlling, and leading in various situations, both in domestic and global operations.  Students are challenged to apply these concepts in ways that foster team cohesiveness and efficiency through effective management of operations and operations management.  Students develop a sound understanding of the relationship between each managerial function, successful execution of these functions, and desired results. In addition, ethical considerations as they relate to operations decisions will be explored

  
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    MGT 420 - Compensation and Benefits

    3 Credit(s)
    The course explores the linkage between employee motivation and compensation and benefit systems across the employee lifecycle.  Attention is given to the changing needs of the global workforce.  Prerequisite(s): MGT 411  

  
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    MGT 430 - Training and Development

    3 Credit(s)
    This course reviews basic employee appraisal, training and career development issues with special emphasis on program design, implementation, and evaluation.  Prerequisite(s): MGT 411  

  
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    MGT 431 - Performance Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides practical working knowledge of processes of setting expectations, monitoring performance, coaching and developing employees, and assessing and rewarding good performance in rapidly changing organizations.  Prerequisite(s): MGT 411  

  
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    MKT 230 - Principles of Marketing

    3 Credit(s)
    The course provides the fundamentals of marketing management in a dynamic organizational environment, including an analysis of such functions as: the marketing mix, the 4Ps, product development, promotion, channels of distribution, segmentation strategy and strategies to achieve competitive advantage.  An introduction to the basic tools of market research is also provided. Marketing in a global world and corporate responsibility in marketing are also explored.

  
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    MKT 240 - Social Media Marketing

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces social media marketing. This course shows how to construct social media strategies that achieve desired marketing goals. Students will review techniques for identifying targeted marketing, with emphasis on critical online market segments, so a company can reach its marketing goals using selective social media platforms. Ethical considerations for marketers in social media are discussed and consideration is given to monitoring and evaluating the implementation of social media marketing initiatives.

  
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    MKT 431 - Consumer Behavior

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines the relationship of domestic and global consumer behavior and the marketing mix.  Topics include differentiation strategies through the understanding of psychological and socio-cultural influences on consumer purchase decisions, strategic consumer behavior models, the role of ethics in consumer behavior research and marketing.  Prerequisite(s): MKT 230  

  
  •  

    VII 499 - Virtual International Internship

    4 Credit(s)
    This strength-based virtual international internship experience provides the student with an opportunity to explore career interests while applying knowledge and skills learned in the classroom in a work setting. The experience also helps students gain a clearer sense of what they still need to learn and provides an opportunity to build professional networks. Strengths Finder will be a main component of the course.


Community Psychology

  
  
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    CP 310 - Mapping Communities

    3 Credit(s)
    This course aims to begin unpacking some of these relationships around the concept of “community” by conducting a community-based mapping project. Maps can be powerful tools to tell stories and know about communities we live. By creating a framework to understand and represent our communities better, we can collect, analyze, and represent valuable knowledge about the communities around us. By developing a community-based mapping projects with these new technologies, students will reveal new insights about communities that were not so visible before mapping. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology  PSY 103 Developmental Psychology  PSY 105 Abnormal Psychology  PSY 201 Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience  

  
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    CP 312 - Critical Gender and Sexuality Studies

    3 Credit(s)
  
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    CP 315 - Drugs: Use and Abuse in Contemporary Society

    3 Credit(s)
    The course is designed to introduce the student to the social reality of drug use and abuse in the US.  It will explore the different categories of illegal and legal drugs and review their basic psychopharmacology.  We will study the historical significance and social construction of drug use and addiction.  This course will look at issues surrounding drug policy, drug legislation, drug enforcement and its relationship to crime, medicalization in our society, and various movements aimed at drugs.  Students will emerge with a multifaceted understanding of drugs and their place within American society, including basic statistics, consequences and ramifications of regulation, and theories of addiction and alcoholism.

  
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    CP 316 - Geopolitical of Migrations and Mobility- Its Impact on Community

    3 Credit(s)
  
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    CP 317 - Institutions and Social Change

    3 Credit(s)
  
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    CP 320 - Psychology of Culture, Power, and Inequality

    3 Credit(s)
    It examines the role played by culture in explaining persistent inequality in the distribution of resources and power.   The course will examine the unique inequity processes across different social groups, such as race, class and gender as well as the intersection of these statuses.  The course will introduce key social psychological concepts and apply theories to understand how and why inequality persists in the US.  In this class we will cover some of the most important concepts (e.g. stigma) for understanding inequality and examine several key axes (e.g. gender) along which inequality is created. Prerequisite(s): CP 301 Introduction to Community Psychology  

  
  
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    CP 411 - Risk and Resilience

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to intervention and prevention efforts designed to improve educational, learning, mental health, and behavioral outcomes in children, adolescents, and young adults. The overall goal of the course is to better understand the focal contributions of the social environment that foster the well-being of children and youth such as schools, organizations, communities, and public policy.

  
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    CP 412 - Eco-Psychology

    3 Credit(s)
  
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    CP 430 - Principles of Field/Action Research

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will focus on developing an understanding and knowledge of interdisciplinary methods and approaches to community action research. Additionally, the course will provide an over-view of approaches to research with a focus of Community-based Participatory Research Design. The content of the course will center on issues related to this topic including an expectation that the student will develop an awareness and understanding of self as a researcher and their personal biases. It is expected that the student will develop an ability to identify and access legitimate sources of psychological research. Important features of the course will be learning about community research practice within multicultural settings, knowledge about the inclusion of diverse perspectives in research practice, develop the ability to address issues of social justice in community research and knowledge about ethical research practices. Prerequisite(s): CP 301 Introduction to Community Psychology CP 310 Mapping Communities CP 320 Psychology of Culture, Power, and Inequality STATS 225 Integrated Statistics  and RESM 235 Research Methods for the Social Sciences   

  
  
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    CP 480 - Community Psychology Capstone and Fieldwork

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to be a “culminating” experience in the undergraduate Community Psychology degree.  Students will create a final assessment portfolio which will include artifacts documenting academic/professional growth and personal reflections.  Students will also assess the impact of their educational experiences on their ethical perspectives and critical thinking skills. Students will reflect on and evaluate their personal and professional growth, the benefits of lifelong learning, and the impact of these elements on their future.  This is also the second (of two) Fieldwork courses.  Students will continue at their previous fieldwork site and will incorporate their Signature Assignment from Fieldwork 1 course into their final Capstone project. Prerequisite(s): CP 301 Introduction to Community Psychology CP 410 Community Mental Health  and CP 470 Fieldwork in Community Psychology  

  
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    GEN 400 - The Global Community: International Study Abroad

    3 Credit(s)

Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECE 205 - Cognitive Development: How Children Learn

    3 Credit(s)
    This course explores the cognitive development of young children with consideration of biological and environmental influences.  It provides an overview of the fundamental theories and principles of cognitive development and the learning process of children.  The course covers topics such as: theories of cognitive development, motivation, memory, learning and brain development.

  
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    ECE 211 - From Theory to Practice

    3 Credit(s)
    This course emphasizes the importance of observation, documentation, and assessment of children within the various contexts in which they exist. The course introduces the concept of inquiry as a professional stance, or a way of knowing and being in the world of Educational practice that informs curriculum development, instruction, and assessment. The course focuses on methods of observation, documentation, and other strategies designed to appropriately assess, monitor, and plan experiences in early childhood. With an emphasis on understanding the influence of the Multiple contexts in which children construct meaning, students will also learn about authentic assessment, practitioner research, and emerging concepts that promote advocacy for children within larger social, political, and cultural contexts. Informed by observation and personal reflection, students will learn about the reciprocal nature of teaching and learning and how to create learning opportunities that are accessible to all students.

  
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    ECE 232 - Introduction to Special Education: Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the history and legal precedence for providing early intervention (EI) and early childhood special education (ECSE) services, characteristics of young children with special needs and their families, and effective instructional techniques for working with this population. Students participate in field experiences throughout the semester.  This is a 3-unit course totaling 45 total hours: 30 hours of instructional time (online or on-ground) and 15 hours online instruction through Canvas. Please note that for every 1 hour of instructional time there is an expected 2 hours of out of class requirements allocated for readings, journals, assignments, etc.

  
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    ECE 251 - The Creative Arts in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s)
    Through activity-based instruction, this course introduces students to creative experiences designed to help early childhood educators develop curriculum in art, music, and movement. Students will also study the physical and motor development of young children.

  
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    ECE 261 - Child, Family, and Community Partnerships in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines the requisite knowledge and skills for successfully establishing, supporting, and maintaining respectful collaborative relationships between today’s diverse families, schools/ centers, and community resources. Students will also be introduced to inclusive programs for children and schools that serve young children with and without special needs.

  
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    ECE 265 - Technology in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to the use of technology to facilitate teaching and learning in Early Childhood Education. The course focuses on the effective use of instructional media and computers in the classroom. Emphasis is placed on the selection, operation, and evaluation of hardware and software for Educational use with young children.

  
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    ECE 270 - Infants and Toddlers

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines and analyzes theoretical frameworks and contemporary research on infant and toddler development (prenatal - 2 years). Emphasis will be placed on the developmental milestones of infancy and toddlerhood. Students will explore the environmental influences on development such as parenting, poverty, second language acquisition, disability, prejudice, and policy.

  
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    ECE 280 - Healthy Living in Early Childhood

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces students to an overview of health, safety and nutritional needs of young children and early childhood practices that ensure the health and well-being and safety of each child in a group setting, reinforcing wellness at home and at school.  Topics include: the foundations of optimal nutrition for toddlers, preschoolers, and school-age children, foodborne illness, food safety, promoting healthful practices, evaluating children’s health and development.

  
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    ECE 290 - Diversity, Equity & Social Justice in ECE

    3 Credit(s)
    This class will introduce foundational concepts, models and rationale for developing anti-bias curriculum, with a particular focus on early childhood education and developmentally appropriate practice. Attitudes and behaviors towards others in the areas of gender, race, culture, abilities and class will be addressed. Other content will include: developmental issues, curriculum models, analysis of resources/materials and beginning advocacy tools. The importance of self-introspection and critical thinking will be stressed.

  
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    ECE 301 - Foundations of ECE and Current Issues in the Education of Young Children

    3 Credit(s)
    This course explores the foundations of early childhood education from birth through age eight. Students will examine theories, history, curriculum, program applications, current issues and trends, and best practices.

  
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    ECE 305 - Cognitive Development: How Children Learn

    3 Credit(s)
    This course explores the cognitive development of young children with consideration of biological and environmental influences.  It provides an overview of the fundamental theories and principles of cognitive development and the learning process of children.  The course covers topics such as: theories of cognitive development, motivation, memory, learning and brain development.

  
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    ECE 306 - Play in Childhood

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is an exploration of play as a human adaptive function with a distinct developmental course, beginning in infancy and varying in content and mode from culture to culture. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to observe children’s play and to make use of these observations in planning for a child; the importance of the physical environment; and the setting up of environments for play that will engage children in using the skills that are pre-requisites for academic learning. Cultural and gender issues and ways to support cultural expression and non-sexist play opportunities will be examined. Although our focus will be on early years, we will address the integrative and transformative function of play as it contributes to the lives of individuals throughout the life span.

  
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    ECE 311 - From Theory to Practice

    3 Credit(s)
    This course emphasizes the importance of observation, documentation, and assessment of children within the various contexts in which they exist. The course introduces the concept of inquiry as a professional stance, or a way of knowing and being in the world of Educational practice that informs curriculum development, instruction, and assessment. The course focuses on methods of observation, documentation, and other strategies designed to appropriately assess, monitor, and plan experiences in early childhood. With an emphasis on understanding the influence of the Multiple contexts in which children construct meaning, students will also learn about authentic assessment, practitioner research, and emerging concepts that promote advocacy for children within larger social, political, and cultural contexts. Informed by observation and personal reflection, students will learn about the reciprocal nature of teaching and learning and how to create learning opportunities that are accessible to all students.

  
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    ECE 320 - Creating Inclusive Learning Environments

    3 Credit(s)
    This course explores values, policies, and practices that support the right of every infant and young child (and his or her family) to participate in a broad range of activities and contexts. Students will be introduced to issues of power and privilege; theories and models of cultural diversity; and educational policy related to issues of access and equity. The focus of the course is to integrate knowledge of various cultural frameworks into the development of inclusive learning environments that provide access to early childhood Education in a diverse society.

  
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    ECE 332 - Introduction to Special Education: Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the history and legal precedence for providing early intervention (EI) and early childhood special education (ECSE) services, characteristics of young children with special needs and their families, and effective instructional techniques for working with this population. Students participate in field experiences throughout the semester.  This is a 3-unit course totaling 45 total hours: 30 hours of instructional time (online or on-ground) and 15 hours online instruction through Canvas. Please note that for every 1 hour of instructional time there is an expected 2 hours of out of class requirements allocated for readings, journals, assignments, etc.

     

  
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    ECE 341 - Social, and Emotional Foundations in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will examine core concepts of social, emotional, and moral development, including attachment, temperament, personality, identity, and social competence. The works of such theorists as Erikson, Vygotsky, Bowlby, and Kohlberg will be critically analyzed, and students will be introduced to current research in the field of early childhood development.

  
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    ECE 351 - The Creative Arts in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s)
    Through activity-based instruction, this course introduces students to creative experiences designed to help early childhood educators develop curriculum in art, music, and movement. Students will also study the physical and motor development of young children.

  
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    ECE 352 - The Inclusive Early Childhood Education Classroom

    3 Credit(s)
    This course promotes the critical thinker, with the technical skills of a creative planner and effective practitioner.  Focus on children with autism and intervention strategies most successful in the earliest years.  This course helps preschool teachers and directors identify young children who may be on the autism spectrum and work with parents to achieve optimal outcomes through referral, intervention and effective techniques for working with children in an early childhood setting.  Students will conduct observations, assessment and individualized planning/ implementing learning experiences, IEPs/IFSPs, and transition plans for children with special needs with emphasis on observation/reflection to curriculum planning. This course applies toward Title 22 Regulations and Title 5 Child Development Permits.
    Students participate in field experiences throughout the semester.  This is a 3-unit course totaling 45 total hours: 30 hours of instructional time (online or on-ground) and 15 hours online instruction through Canvas. Please note that for every 1 hour of instructional time there is an expected 2 hours of out of class requirements allocated for readings, journals, assignments, etc.

    Prerequisites:  ECE332: Introduction of Special Needs with a grade of “B” or better; or by permission of the instructor.

     

  
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    ECE 361 - Child, Family, and Community Partnerships in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines the requisite knowledge and skills for successfully establishing, supporting, and maintaining respectful collaborative relationships between today’s diverse families, schools/ centers, and community resources. Students will also be introduced to inclusive programs for children and schools that serve young children with and without special needs.

  
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    ECE 365 - Technology in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to the use of technology to facilitate teaching and learning in Early Childhood Education. The course focuses on the effective use of instructional media and computers in the classroom. Emphasis is placed on the selection, operation, and evaluation of hardware and software for Educational use with young children.

  
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    ECE 370 - Infants and Toddlers

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines and analyzes theoretical frameworks and contemporary research on infant and toddler development (prenatal - 2 years). Emphasis will be placed on the developmental milestones of infancy and toddlerhood. Students will explore the environmental influences on development such as parenting, poverty, second language acquisition, disability, prejudice, and policy.

  
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    ECE 380 - Healthy Living in Early Childhood

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces students to an overview of health, safety and nutritional needs of young children and early childhood practices that ensure the health and well-being and safety of each child in a group setting, reinforcing wellness at home and at school.  Topics include: the foundations of optimal nutrition for toddlers, preschoolers, and school-age children, foodborne illness, food safety, promoting healthful practices, evaluating children’s health and development.

  
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    ECE 390 - Diversity, Equity & Social Justice in ECE

    3 Credit(s)
    This class will introduce foundational concepts, models and rationale for developing anti-bias curriculum, with a particular focus on early childhood education and developmentally appropriate practice. Attitudes and behaviors towards others in the areas of gender, race, culture, abilities and class will be addressed. Other content will include: developmental issues, curriculum models, analysis of resources/materials and beginning advocacy tools. The importance of self-introspection and critical thinking will be stressed.

  
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    ECE 391 - Supervised Practicum in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s)
    In this course, students complete at least 120 hours (approximately 17 hours per week) of supervised practicum experience at an approved early childhood education classroom or other setting. The placement is accompanied by a weekly seminar. Seminar topics include cooperative learning, curriculum development, classroom management, differentiating instruction, lesson planning and assessment, and parent-teacher interaction.

  
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    ECE 400 - Action Research in ECE I

    1 Credit(s)
    In this course, students focus collaboratively on the early childhood education setting as a unit of observation, reflection, and practice. Within the context of this course, students will spend 25 hours observing classrooms in a variety of education settings across the early childhood age span (birth - 8 years).  In this introduction to fieldwork, students learn the fundamentals of observation and documentation and will participate in group discussions and self-reflection exercises to integrate their learning experiences.  Students will largely focus their attention on the structure and dynamics of the classroom environment; the organization of routines, procedures, and transitions; the classroom management plan; the schedules for days and weeks; and paraprofessional and parent participation. Students will also begin to recognize and identify the behavior of young children in terms of the developmental and cultural theories, models, and concepts presented throughout the program. By observing children in early childhood education settings, students have an opportunity to practice applying their knowledge and to refine their observation and documentation skills prior to placement in an actual ECE classroom setting. This course is the first of a three-part fieldwork series, which must be completed in sequence. The whole series meets the fieldwork requirement for the bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education.

  
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    ECE 401 - Action Research in ECE II

    1 Credit(s)
    In these courses, students will be engaged in a process of inquiry or research in an early childcare setting. Students will engage in a focused study of the environment in an effort to improve the quality of the curriculum or the environment. They will observe, and then collect data, analyze the data in an effort to improve their own practice.

  
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    ECE 402 - Action Research in ECE III

    1 Credit(s)
    In these courses, students will be engaged in a process of inquiry or research in an early childcare setting. Students will engage in a focused study of the environment in an effort to improve the quality of the curriculum or the environment. They will observe, and then collect data, analyze the data in an effort to improve their own practice.

  
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    ECE 406 - Emergent Curriculum: Reflecting Learner Lives

    3 Credit(s)
    In this class, students will explore sources of emergent curriculum, focusing upon the community that teachers and learners implement together, utilizing the emergent curriculum process-observation, analysis, collaboration, research and documentation, implications for learners of all ages will be analyzed, with a focus on the early childhood and school age classroom.

  
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    ECE 410 - Portfolio Seminar

    3 Credit(s)
    Through this course, students will work collaboratively in reflecting/editing their individual professional portfolios based on the learning experiences accumulated through the program. The professional portfolio should reflect the student’s individual professional philosophy as a leader in the field.

  
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    ECE 415 - Family Violence and Child Abuse

    3 Credit(s)

    Students will examine methods used in the identification of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and neglect in young children. The course will incorporate an emphasis on identification of child abuse and developing skills for working with children and families. It includes:

    • What are child maltreatment, neglect, and abuse?
    • What are the risk factors contributing to child abuse?
    • How to recognize physical and behavioral indicators of child abuse and maltreatment?
    • Understanding the law: Mandated Child Abuse reporting.
    • Protective custody


  
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    ECE 416 - Separation, Deployment Trauma, and Early Development

    3 Credit(s)

    This course will examine the different ways trauma can affect young children. Students will also understand the impact of deployment on children and will learn to understand the effects of the separation of the child from the parent and of the parent’s absence in the child’s life for a short or long term. Topics will include:

    • What is Early Childhood Trauma?
    • What causes stress for children?
    • Childhood Symptoms and Behaviors Associated with Exposure to Trauma
    • Enhancing Resilience in Young Children
    • Identifying and Providing Services to Young Children Who Have Been Exposed to Trauma
    • Effects of separation on children
    • Overview of the cycle and stages of deployment
    • Understanding reactions to deployment
    • Talking to children about deployment
    • Coping with high-threat deployment
    • Warning signs in young children


  
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    ECE 417 - Death, Divorce, and Difficult Times

    3 Credit(s)

    This course will explore impact of death and divorce in the life of a young child. It will include an understanding of the grieving process, and early childhood attachment. Theories of attachment as well as the continuum of possible attachment related behaviors are explained. Methods to facilitate healthy attachment are discussed. It includes:

    • What is Early Childhood pain and loss?
    • What is grief?
    • What are the emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physical reactions that children can have?
    • Why does divorce lower children’s well-being?
    • How does inter-parental conflict affect children?
    • What interventions might benefit children of divorce?
    • What directions should future research in this topic take?


  
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    ECE 418 - Trauma, Culture, and Immigration

    3 Credit(s)

    Most immigrant families function well in many domains and never come in contact with the child welfare system or child protection systems. But when they do, depending on their country of origin, generational and legal status, reason for emigration, and immigration and resettlement experiences, it becomes especially challenging to untangle the range of factors that contribute to their capacity to protect and nurture their children. Topics will include: Acculturation

    • Strengths and challenges faced by immigrant children
    • Cultural identity
    • Immigration and refugee families
    • The impact of the law on young children
    • Transgenerational immigration experiences
    • Events during migration (e.g., parental separation, hunger)
    • Transgenerational acculturation differences
    • Discrimination experiences
    • Integrating Cultural Values


  
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    ECE 419 - Parent Incarceration and Its Impact

    3 Credit(s)

    This course will prepare graduate level students to understand and implement developmentally appropriate teaching techniques to help children whose parent(s) may be incarcerated. To understand the impact of the incarceration process on children students will learn to understand separately the effects of the arrest and incarceration of a parent on a child. The student will explore the effects of the separation of the child from the parent and of the parent’s absence in the child’s life for a short or long term. Topics will include:

    • The effects of incarceration on infants and young children
    • Does gender play a role in a parent’s incarceration?
    • What are the effects of incarceration on young boys and on young girls?
    • Do living arrangements play a role in such conditions??
    • The impact of custodial care during parental incarceration
    • How can we teach children about personal safety?
    • Child visitation


  
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    ECE 430 - Play, Language, and Literacy

    3 Credit(s)
    How do young children develop the skills they need to grow up competent in a literate society - language, dramatic play, using tools and materials to represent their experience, and reading? This course is an examination of the development of symbolic behaviors and the role of adults in supporting children’s play, language and literacy. Students will examine developmentally appropriate curriculum and assessment design for diverse literacy learners.

  
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    ECE 432 - Children’s Literature

    3 Credit(s)
    Students will examine multiple genres of children’s literature from multicultural and international contexts. Texts discussed include picture books, traditional folk and fairy tales, novels, poetry, and informational books. This course will address anti-bias issues in children’s literature. Students will explore when and how to use reading materials and language to meet specific needs, and how to create an environment that encourages positive relationships between children and literacy. 45 Course Hours Total: 30 hours of seat time and 15 hours online instruction through Canvas.

  
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    ECE 435 - STEAM Integration of Science and Technology

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will focus on instruction and integration of emergent and developing STEAM principles.  Students will research, plan, implement and evaluate developmentally appropriate practices integrating strategies and skills to develop integrated Science and Technology experiences for children Candidates will explore activities magnetism, cause and effect, shadows/light, motion, patterns, measuring speed and distance, color and light and nature.

  
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    ECE 436 - STEAM Thinking, Reasoning and Discovering Mathematics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will focus on designing, implementing and evaluating appropriate activities and environments for children with a focus on Mathematics, thinking and reasoning blocks, math, woodworking, and engineering with art concepts integrated with emphasis on current research in early childhood education.  Participants will broaden their own creativity and imagination through exploring learning activities that can be applied to actual early childhood settings.  Students will design age-appropriate classroom and outdoor learning environments that meet state regulations.

 

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