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Pacific Oaks College    
2019-2020 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
 
  Dec 10, 2019
 
2019-2020 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook

Bachelor of Arts in Community Psychology


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LOCATIONS

Pasadena, San Jose, and off-campus locations

*The availability of off-campus locations depends on enrollment.

Program Overview

The School of Cultural & Family Psychology’s Bachelor of Arts in Community Psychology (BA CP) seeks to promote well-being, empower and invigorate communities and support a sense of community and family centric models of service and learning.  Our strength-based programs aim to enhance protective factors and prevent the development of problems in communities, groups and families.  Grounded in social justice and equity frameworks, individuals will learn how to advocate for change in traditionally underserved communities.  Our curriculum is designed to go beyond an individual focus by integrating sociological, economic, cultural, environmental, political and global influences to promote positive change, health and empowerment at multiple levels.

This is designed as a four-year program, that will be offered in both on-ground and online formats.  Degree will offer a minimum of 30 credits of BA CP upper division program requirements and Concentration degree credits.  Students will be able to transfer in up to 87 credits (out of minimum total of 120 credits) from another institution.  Students will be able to earn a possible 30 credits in Prior Learning Assessment (PLA).  Starting in fall 2018, there will be three possible Concentrations: (1) Generalist; (2) Elementary Education; and (3) Advocacy & Social Justice. The BA Community Psychology offsite cohorts require approval from the Dean prior to entering after the cohort has started.

This program offers busy students a perfect balance of flexibility and live interaction.

Community Psychology Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

PLO 1:  Gain knowledge and comprehension of human life cycle within an eco-systemic framework.-Students will be able to look at individuals over the course of their life-span using Urie Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory of Development as a foundational framework as the lens for understanding how people interact within their communities over time.  Students will use case studies to facilitate their understanding of these concepts.  Additional theories to be explored will be: Barker’s Social Ecological Approach; and Kelly’s Ecological Approach to Community Psychology.  Some of the skills and abilities that students will learn from learning about this ecological approach are:  Mindfulness; Systemic Thinking; Listening Skills, Cross-cultural Competence; Facilitating Communication.

PLO 2:  Be able to identify resources from multicultural stakeholders to address social issues.-Students will develop skills such as ‘Community Mapping’ and action/field research in their fieldwork sites, to identify needed resources relevant to a particular population.  Students will create resource guides, complete needs assessments and community mapping projects to demonstrate knowledge of these skills.

PLO 3:  Learn and implement interdisciplinary approaches and strategies for community programs assessment and research. -Students will learn Community Psychology values and principles for conducting assessments, such as, participatory evaluation and action-oriented assessment.  Students will demonstrate knowledge competencies in these areas in their Fieldwork Needs Assessment assignment and their Capstone project.

PLO 4:  Be able to discuss and analyze effective prevention, intervention, and health promotion strategies for individuals, groups, and communities- Students will learn foundational prevention and promotion theories and concepts, such as: Caplan: Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Prevention; The IOM Report: Universal, Selective, and Indicated Measures; Prevention of Disorder and Promotion of Wellness and Competence.  Students will research examples of successful prevention and promotion programs.  Students will demonstrate knowledge by completing a literature review on a prevention and promotion topic of their choice.

PLO 5:  Develop multicultural competency through community-based training and experience. -Students will gain an understanding of human diversity in its context by participating in a Fieldwork placement experience.  Students will be required to spend at least 40-hours at a community organization of their choice.  These experiences will build upon cross-cultural theories learned in coursework to provide competence needed for effective intervention with culturally diverse clients in local and global communities. Their fieldwork experiences will span over two terms/semesters.

Each BA in Community Psychology PLO is aligned with WASC Core Competencies.  Below is a description of which BA CP PLOs is aligned with each Core Competency.

Written Communication- Students will demonstrate mastery in this competency with reflection papers, research papers, discussion questions.  Assignments will include rubrics for expectations on paper structures depending on type of written assignment.

  • PLO 1:  Gain knowledge and comprehension of human life cycle within an eco-systemic framework.
  • PLO 2:  Be able to identify resources from multicultural stakeholders to address social issues.
  • PLO 4:  Be able to discuss and analyze effective prevention, intervention, and promotion strategies for individuals, groups, and communities
  • PLO 5:  Develop multicultural competency through community-based training and experience.

Information Literacy-  Students will demonstrate mastery in this competency with conducting research online, fieldwork assignments, an annotated bibliography, and a literature review, using a variety of sources found in the Library’s database.  Several courses will include presentations by the Librarian.

  • PLO 1:  Gain knowledge and comprehension of human life cycle within an eco-systemic framework.
  • PLO 2:  Be able to identify resources from multicultural stakeholders to address social issues.
  • PLO 4:  Be able to discuss and analyze effective prevention, intervention, and promotion strategies for individuals, groups, and communities

Critical Thinking-  Students will demonstrate mastery in this competency with small group discussions, individual and group projects, discussions questions, and fieldwork assignments that show the ability to develop and defend an argument.

  • PLO 1:  Gain knowledge and comprehension of human life cycle within an eco-systemic framework.
  • PLO 2:  Be able to identify resources from multicultural stakeholders to address social issues.
  • PLO 3:  Learn and implement interdisciplinary approaches and strategies to community programs and research.

Oral Communication-  Students will demonstrate mastery of this competency with class discussions, visual presentations online, small group discussions, individual and group presentations.

  • PLO 4:  Be able to discuss and analyze effective prevention, intervention, and promotion strategies for individuals, groups, and communities
  • PLO 5:  Develop multicultural competency through community-based training and experience.

Quantitative Reasoning- Students will demonstrate mastery of this competency by conducting original research projects like needs assessments in fieldwork, assignments in Integrative Statistics course, and the integration and use of statistics in Capstone Project.

  • PLO 3: Learn and implement interdisciplinary approaches and strategies to community programs and research.

Fieldwork Requirements

The Community Psychology Fieldwork program is designed to provide experience in a human service or mental health community-based agency.   This opportunity is for students to put into practice the skills and knowledge they have gained throughout the Community Psychology degree program in a professional setting.  Field Work can be central to the development of clarity about a student’s career goals and their sense of calling to specific work.  Students develop consultation and group skills, work collaboratively with community partners, and learn about the field of community psychology.  The specific learning plan will be created with fieldwork instructor, fieldwork supervisor and student.

Fieldwork placement will occur over the course of two terms/semesters.  There is a minimum of 40 hours required by each student at their site in each term/semester.  Students in the Elementary Education concentration will complete “fieldwork” and clinical practice in the School of Education with student teaching experiences.  The CP fieldwork courses will be substituted with SOE Directed Teaching courses.

The Fieldwork Program will be managed by the department Academic Coordinator.  Each student will be required to attend a Fieldwork Orientation, where students will receive a Fieldwork Manual, which will include the following information:  Code of Ethics and Professional Behavior Form, Fieldwork/Internship Contract Form, Fieldwork/Internship Deadlines and Preparation Checklist, Timesheet Form, Evaluation of Fieldworker/Intern Form, Evaluation of Site Form, Evaluation of Supervisor Form, and Fieldwork/Internship Site Directory.  Fieldwork Supervision will be provided jointly between the POC Instructor and the supervisor at the field site, with the field site supervisor providing direct supervision.  The Academic Coordinator will liaison between all entities to ensure quality.  The Academic Coordinator will review all Site Review forms (completed by students) to determine if there are any problems or challenges that need to be addressed. 

Prerequisites include junior classification, at least 12 credits of Community Psychology coursework and course prerequisites met.  ALL Community Psychology students will be given Watermark accounts.  All of the Fieldwork forms will be located in Watermark for students and Fieldwork Site Supervisors. 

There will be two Fieldwork courses that will accompany a student’s placement in the field.  The first is “Fieldwork in Community Psychology”.  This course is designed to provide an opportunity to integrate classroom knowledge with real world experiences.  This course focuses on applications of basic psychological knowledge and methods to community problems.  Students develop consultation and group skills, work collaboratively with community partners, and learn about the field of community psychology.  The second course is “Community Psychology Capstone and Fieldwork”.  This course is designed to be a ‘culminating’ experience in the undergraduate Community Psychology degree.  Students will create a final assessment portfolio which will include artifacts documenting academic and professional growth and personal reflections.  Students will incorporate their Signature Assignment from the first Fieldwork course into their final capstone project.  Each one of these courses is 3 credits.  Capstone projects and Fieldwork Signature Assignments will be submitted in Watermark and Canvas.  

The Fieldwork Site List (pre-approved list of agencies) is not meant to be inclusive; rather it serves to give students ideas of the types and variety of fieldwork experiences students have developed. Students are encouraged to meet with Faculty Advisor and the Academic Coordinator to discuss possible Fieldwork sites that would best meet the interests of the student.  Typical Settings & Categories of Fieldwork:  Child/Youth; Elderly Services; Tutoring Services; Persons with Disabilities; Homelessness; Substance Abuse; Recreation Programs; Health/Prevention/Education; Domestic Violence; Autism Spectrum Disorders Services, After-school Programs; Hospice; Psychiatric facilities; Hotlines, clinics, shelters, hospitals, educational settings, non-profit agencies.  Type of fieldwork experience will depend on student’s career goals, type of agency, and personalized learning plan created by field supervisor and student.

Program Specific Requirements

General Education - School of Cultural & Family Psychology 

The General Education (GE) requirements for the for School of Cultural & Family Psychology include the 40 credits listed in the chart below.  The remaining 80 credits will include General Electives (approximately 50 credits) and program/major (approximately 30 credits) depending on the specific concentration selected in the Community Psychology degree program.

 GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

40 credits required from the courses below. General Education courses can be applied to only one category. 

Pacific Oaks Culture and Pedagogy - 3 credits required 

English Communication - 9 credits required, at least one course in English Composition and one course in oral communication 

Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning - 3 credits required 

Arts and Humanities - 9 credits required with at least one course from the arts and one course from humanities 

Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 credits required, three courses from at least two disciplines 

Physical and Biological Sciences -  7 credits required, One physical science course and one biological science or life science course, at least one of which includes a lab 

Total Required GE Credits: 40 

The BA CP program is a 120-148 credit undergraduate program, comprised of 37 credits in General Education, 30-58 credits in Community Psychology (including Concentrations), and 53 credits of general electives.  This is a year-round program, including enrollment in summer.  On-ground attendance includes fall and spring 16-week semesters and a 12-week summer semester.  Online attendance includes two 8-week terms in fall and spring, and two 6-week terms in summer. 

A full-time student entering with 0 credits and successfully completing 12 credits per semester would have a time to completion of ten semesters, which is equivalent to 3 1/3 years, or 40 months.

BA in Community Psychology Credit Requirements

40 General Education Credits

50 General Elective Credits (22 Credits if Elementary Education Concentration)

21 Upper Division Community Psychology Program Credits

  • Plus 9 credits for Generalist Concentration OR
  • Plus 9 credits for Advocacy & Social Justice Concentration OR
  • Plus 37 credits for Elementary Education Concentration *

120 Credits Total

Program Courses


Pacific Oaks College maintains a 30-credit residency requirement.

21 Credits total


Core Courses


Courses listed in sequence

21 Credits total


9 Credits Total


37 credits total


Credential Specific Requirements


Admission Requirements

  • Successfully meet the Basic Skills Requirement (e.g., California Basic Education Skills Test or CBEST) prior to enrolling in credential courses
  • Proof of registration or payment for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET: Multiple Subjects; i.e., Subtests I, II, and III) with test dates in the first six months of initial enrollment in credential courses

Portfolio

Candidates in Credential programs will complete an electronic portfolio on Taskstream. The portfolio is comprised of signature assignments and other assignments completed by the candidate throughout their program coursework. Satisfactory evaluation of the portfolio is required in order for degree conferral. A bachelor’s degree is a requirement prior to recommendation for the Preliminary Multiple Subject Teaching Credential.

The Student Agreement

To ensure that graduates of Pacific Oaks’ teacher credentialing programs are able to meet the legal requirements of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC), all applicants for Admission to Credential programs must enter into a student agreement.

The student agreement gives Pacific Oaks the right to suspend or terminate the candidate’s participation in the Credential program upon showing that the candidate has:

  • Committed acts or engaged in conduct that could constitute Grounds for denial of a Credential;
  • Failed to demonstrate the requisite skills and qualifications to satisfy the requirements for a Credential;

or

  • Demonstrated other qualities or behaviors enumerated in the student agreement inconsistent with Pacific Oaks’ recommendation of the candidate for an Education Credential. The student agreement also authorizes Pacific Oaks to release to the Commission all pertinent information pertaining to the candidate’s qualification or fitness for a Credential.

 

Student Assistance, Notice of Need to Improve, And Dismissal from School of Education Programs


Pacific Oaks is committed to maintaining quality Standards throughout its Credential programs and to graduating competent professional educators. As required by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC), Pacific Oaks identifies and assists candidates who need special assistance and retains in its programs only those candidates who are suited for entry to or advancement in the Education profession. The CTC is charged by the state with evaluating the moral character and fitness of all persons who wish to teach or perform certified services in California public schools. Every person who is an applicant for, or who now holds any Credential, certificate, permit, or license authorizing service in California public schools is answerable to the CTC and the Committee on Credentials for his or her fitness-related conduct. California’s Laws and Rules Pertaining to the Discipline of Professional Certificated Personnel (2002), available on the CTC website at www.ctc.ca.gov, address legal, ethical, and behavioral Standards to which all such persons must adhere.

If a candidate is identified as being deficient or needing assistance to meet program standards at any point during his or her program, the candidate’s instructor of record during coursework or fieldwork supervisor during a fieldwork assignment will issue the candidate a Need for Improvement Plan. The plan will indicate one of three possible actions that the instructor/supervisor intends to recommend to the lead faculty in the program:

  1. The candidate is identified as needing improvement in designated areas. A plan of improvement, with an expected date of completion, is attached to the form. The candidate will be permitted to continue taking classes or continue in his/her fieldwork assignment while completing the plan.
  2. The candidate is identified as needing improvement in designated areas. A plan of improvement, with an expected date of completion, is attached to the form.
  3. The candidate receives a failing grade in the class or an unsatisfactory grade in the fieldwork assignment. The candidate will not be permitted to continue taking classes or continue in his/her fieldwork assignment until the plan is completed and the class or fieldwork assignment is re-taken, at the candidate’s expense.
  4. The candidate is identified as being unsuited for the Education profession and is recommended for dismissal from the program.
  5. Upon receiving a Candidate Assistance Plan, the candidate will meet with his/her instructor of record, fieldwork supervisor, and/or other faculty or administration. This Candidate Assistance Team will discuss any recommended plan of improvement with the candidate and will later meet with the candidate to evaluate the candidate’s performance of the expectations listed on the plan.

If the candidate is allowed to continue in the program and receives a second unsatisfactory grade in a practicum or student teaching assignment, the candidate will be recommended for dismissal from the program. The process for a hearing and appeal, upon recommendation for dismissal from a program, is outlined in the Policies and Procedures section of this catalog.

Fieldwork and Clinical Practice

Fieldwork consists of practicum observation and supervised clinical practice/student teaching. A negative TB test and Certificate of Clearance or other CTC-issued permit are requirements for both experiences. Credential candidates must complete 75 hours of practicum prior to student teaching. These hours are distributed in five to fifteen-hour increments across seven core credential courses.

Student teaching is the culminating clinical practice experience and is undertaken during a candidate’s final semester. Student teaching is full-time, typically unpaid, and performed under the guidance of a seasoned mentor teacher. The Credentials Office coordinates all student teaching placements and mentor teacher assignments in conjunction with districts and/or school sites. The following prerequisites must be met by March 1 for fall semester placement or October 1 for spring semester placement:

  • receive faculty advisor approval to student teach;
  • satisfy the Basic Skills Requirement (e.g., CBEST);
  • obtain a valid Certificate of Clearance or any other California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC)-issued permit;
  • obtain a valid negative TB Test;
  • demonstrate subject matter competence with passing CSET: Multiple Subjects scores (Subtest I, II, III);
  • maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or above in credential coursework;
  • submit a Student Teaching Application by the appropriate deadline; and
  • complete a Student Teaching Interview.


The above requirements will be verified by the Credentials Office prior to approving a candidate’s Student Teaching application for fall or spring. Once a candidate’s placement is confirmed, the candidate and mentor teacher will be required to attend a mandatory Student Teaching Orientation.

Graduation Requirements

Students are required to submit the Petition for Degree Completion and fee to the Office of the Registrar the semester before they anticipate completing their degree requirements. Students must submit the application, settle all outstanding fees with the Student Finance Office, satisfy any deficiencies, and be in good standing in their program for the bachelor’s degree to be awarded.

Note: A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or above in credential coursework is required for the credential.

Recommendation for a Preliminary Teaching Credential

The following credential items must be completed and on file with the Credentials Office in order to be recommended to the state of California for a Preliminary Teaching Credential:

  • bachelor’s degree or higher from a regionally accredited institution with official transcript on file;
  • completion of Basic Skills Requirement;
  • Certificate of Clearance or any other valid California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC)‐issued permit;
  • valid negative TB test;
  • completion of U.S. Constitution requirement;
  • passing CSET: Multiple Subjects scores;
  • passing scores for CalTPA Instructional Cycle 1: Learning About Students and Planning Instruction and CalTPA Instructional Cycle 2: Assessment-Driven Instruction;
  • certification of infant, child, and adult CPR training; and
  • passing RICA scores.

All credential items must be valid at the time of credential recommendation.

At the end of the student teaching semester, the teacher candidate’s faculty advisor and the credential analyst will evaluate the candidate’s degree and credential requirements. If all requirements have been met, the credential analyst will recommend the candidate to the CTC for his/her credential. If there are outstanding credential requirements that have not been met, the credential analyst will notify the teacher candidate. Upon credential recommendation, the CTC will send the teacher candidate an email prompting payment. Payments are made directly to the CTC. Teacher candidates cannot receive their credential until they have paid for it on the CTC website. Once completed, candidates will be in the CTC database and listed publicly as a preliminary credential holder. All initial California teaching credentials are known as “preliminary.” Candidates have five years to “clear” their credential. Some school districts will provide support, but it is the candidate’s responsibility to fulfill the requirements to clear his/her credential within the allotted timeframe.

California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA)

The California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA) is one of several assessments required for earning a Preliminary Multiple or Single Subject Teaching Credential, and is designed to measure a candidate’s knowledge, skills and ability in relation to the TPEs. As of July 1, 2008, all candidates in a Commission-approved multiple and single subject teacher preparation program must meet the TPA requirement.

Beginning fall 2018, the state will use a revised Teaching Performance Assessment model that meets the revised Teaching Performance Expectations (TPE) adopted in June 2016. Per the CTC, any candidate starting a program after July 1, 2018 will be required to take the revised CalTPA.

The revised CalTPA is structured around two instructional cycles based on the pedagogical sequence of plan, teach and assess, reflect, and apply. Candidates are expected to respond to the instructional cycles within the context of their teaching assignments; therefore, both TPA Cycles must be completed during student teaching.

Advocacy & Social Justice concentration


This concentration requires 9 credits.

9 Credits Total


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